January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

When choosing a wireless carrier, most Americans just go with AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon. But the reluctance to look beyond the big four, to an alternative carrier, could be costing you serious money.An array of lesser-known carriers in the U.S. use the same networks as the big companies yet offer heavy discounts on your monthly bill—with no contracts. These mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) piggyback on the major carriers’ networks and provide almost identical service.Cheap cell phone plans: A cheat sheet Cut to the chase with the ultra-quick version of our top picks:Best MVNO for low use: Tello  Best…

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

Anyone who has ever set up a router is probably familiar with Wireless Protected Access, or WPA encryption. Now the stage is set for WPA3, an improved Wi-Fi security protocol that brings improved security to network devices.At CES on Monday, the Wi-Fi Alliance announced WPA3, whose improvements will slowly roll out during 2018 in new devices. The Alliance also announced several improvements to the current, but aging WPA2 spec (in place since 2004), to secure it while WPA3-compliant devices move into the market.WPA’s chief improvements include individualized data encryption, so that hackers lurking on public Wi-Fi networks will find it more difficult…

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

Sonos has designed the Play:1 wireless speaker to look and sound great in any space, whether it’s a kitchen counter or the bookshelf in your bedroom. It contains two Class D amplifiers, one 3.5″ mid–woofer for mid–range frequencies and deep bass, and one tweeter for crisp and accurate high–frequency response. Pair multiple speakers together in the same room for a more immersive experience, or add speakers in different rooms. When connected to an Amazon Alexa-enabled device, you can control the Sonos experience hands-free using Alexa voice commands. To read this article in full, please click herePowered by WPeMatico

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

What’s smaller than a tissue box but still packs a liquid-cooled Core i7-8700K and and GeForce GTX 1080? Digital Storm’s Project Spark, a concept PC that’s actually going to be built. It does what no other tiny gaming box has ever done before: It packs top-end performance into a 6 x 4 x 12-inch box. Digital Storm pulls it off by first starting with a custom-built enclosure. Unlike the typical small PCs that use the industry-standard Mini ITX, Project Spark uses the less popular MicroSTX form factor. Gordon Mah Ung Yup. It’s a tiny gaming rig with full custom liquid cooling.To…

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

Another CES, another Razer Prototype. Unlike last year’s three-screened laptop Project Valerie, Razer’s Project Linda, announced Tuesday, is something that might actually make it to market. Project Linda is a dock for your Razer Phone in the form of a laptop.Razer’s approach might have taken inspiration from the clamshell-like Lap Dock (originally called the Mobile Extender) that shipped as an option for HP’s Elite x3 Windows phone. That phone is dead, though, so Razer has an opportunity to reincarnate the idea on a more successful phone plaform. I’m optimistic: Project Linda is only a prototype, but it’s the best I’ve…

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

Logitech’s Powerplay technology was one of my favorite bits of hardware in 2017—a wireless mouse that actually charged without wires, thanks to a mousepad with built-in inductive charging. It’s so revolutionary, I assumed the competition wouldn’t be far behind.I was both right and wrong on that account. Today at CES, Razer announced a new version of its RGB-enabled Firefly mousepad, the Firefly HyperFlux. That “HyperFlux” surname is of particular importance, as it’s the name Razer’s given to its version of Powerplay—though there are key differences you should know about.To read this article in full, please click herePowered by WPeMatico

January 9, 2018 CuttingEdgeTech

Massive security vulnerabilities in modern CPUs are forcing a redesign of the kernel software at the heart of all major operating systems. Since the issues—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—exist in the CPU hardware itself, Windows, Linux, Android, macOS, iOS, Chromebooks, and other operating systems all need to protect against it. And worse, plugging the hole can negatively affect your PC’s performance.Everyday home users shouldn’t panic too much though. Just apply all available updates and keep your antivirus software vigilant, as ever. If you want to dive right into the action without all the background information, we’ve also created a focused guide…